Location: Winamac, IN

Size: 22,800 square feet

In collaboration with Pulaski County Administration and Indiana Landmarks, Rowland Design worked to create options to save the Landmark Historic Pulaski County Courthouse from demolition. During the process, our design team completed a full building assessment examining the structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection along with the interior design and layout of each office.

The project was a collaborative effort including exploratory research of the building along with outreach and responses from administration, and public input meetings. The final building assessment produced information required to develop project budgets and action plans. These plans proposed the stabilization of the building’s exteriors and to create an efficient and thermally comfortable interior office space for county staff.

The final presentation, held during the joint Commissioner and County Council session, proposed that building revitalization presents the most economically feasible solution all while preserving a magnificent structure for generations to come.

Services: Full Building Assessment

Pulaski County Courthouse

Pulaski County Courthouse

Location: Winamac, IN

Size: 22,800 square feet

In collaboration with Pulaski County Administration and Indiana Landmarks, Rowland Design worked to create options to save the Landmark Historic Pulaski County Courthouse from demolition. During the process, our design team completed a full building assessment examining the structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection along with the interior design and layout of each office.

The project was a collaborative effort including exploratory research of the building along with outreach and responses from administration, and public input meetings. The final building assessment produced information required to develop project budgets and action plans. These plans proposed the stabilization of the building’s exteriors and to create an efficient and thermally comfortable interior office space for county staff.

The final presentation, held during the joint Commissioner and County Council session, proposed that building revitalization presents the most economically feasible solution all while preserving a magnificent structure for generations to come.

Services: Full Building Assessment

Location: East Grand Rapids, MI

Size: 60,000 square feet

What was once the site of an obsolete department store, is now a spirited mixed-use project with locally owned restaurants, retail, banks and health care offices. This area of Grand Rapids was formerly home to an amusement park and commercial establishments dating from the turn of the last century. Taking inspiration from the historic architectural fabric of the community, facades are divided into singular store fronts allowing tenants a sense of individuality.  

To further the authenticity of the architectural design, a 1920’s bank façade was relocated from downtown Grand Rapids and incorporated into the new facades. A variety of honest materials including brick, limestone, wood and terra cotta provided a level of detail anchoring the project within the community fabric.  

A plaza fountain surrounded by cast bronze player pianos references a time when local pubs disposed of pianos by sending them to a nearby lake shortly after the introduction of the juke box. Anchoring the plaza is the entrance pavilion from the parking deck into the public court. Referencing the range of sail boats at adjacent Reed’s Lake, a 35-foot-tall regatta sculpture and its viewing platform have become a favored location for town meetings and community events.

Services: Architecture

Gaslight Village

Gaslight Village

Location: East Grand Rapids, MI

Size: 60,000 square feet

What was once the site of an obsolete department store, is now a spirited mixed-use project with locally owned restaurants, retail, banks and health care offices. This area of Grand Rapids was formerly home to an amusement park and commercial establishments dating from the turn of the last century. Taking inspiration from the historic architectural fabric of the community, facades are divided into singular store fronts allowing tenants a sense of individuality.  

To further the authenticity of the architectural design, a 1920’s bank façade was relocated from downtown Grand Rapids and incorporated into the new facades. A variety of honest materials including brick, limestone, wood and terra cotta provided a level of detail anchoring the project within the community fabric.  

A plaza fountain surrounded by cast bronze player pianos references a time when local pubs disposed of pianos by sending them to a nearby lake shortly after the introduction of the juke box. Anchoring the plaza is the entrance pavilion from the parking deck into the public court. Referencing the range of sail boats at adjacent Reed’s Lake, a 35-foot-tall regatta sculpture and its viewing platform have become a favored location for town meetings and community events.

Services: Architecture